The Increasing Importance of Cybersecurity in Manufacturing

cybersecurity

The topic of cybersecurity in manufacturing is something most companies only give thought to when an issue arises. Experience shows, many of these attacks happened to large retail organizations that process millions of financial transactions. For business owners within the industrial and manufacturing industries this preference has offered a measure of assurance, if not security. The reason being, many hackers had little interest in tampering with the systems used in these industries.

This is now a false sense of security. A report from Kaspersky Labs, a global cybersecurity company, said that manufacturing companies account for one-third of all attacks. Kaspersky Labs cited an uptick in invasions of Operational Technology (OT), including industrial control systems (ICS) and supervisory control and data acquisition programs (SCADA). OT systems control the management of production lines, monitoring of gas and oil, and the control of other operations. During 2017, Kaspersky Labs cited attacks on ICS and SCADA, including some 18,000 different modifications of malware, according to a report in Tech Republic.

Changing Focus

Kaspersky Labs, which protects corporate systems, data and processes in public sector organizations and smaller businesses, said hackers are switching their focus. These changes could include anything from ransomware to the theft of intellectual property (IP) and most recently crypto mining, which creates a slow, yet steady, stream of stolen funds.

Hackers are constantly shifting their focus, looking for organizations with vulnerabilities such as recent targets in the industries of defense and finance as well as academia. In 2017, energy and industrial firms, petrochemical companies and manufacturing were also targets. In these cases, they chose IP theft as their weapon of choice, using the theft to gain copies of successful products or to gain competitive advantage in the marketplace. IP theft negates the valuable time and money spent on R&D, cutting into margins and competitive advantage.

Damage Control

With cyberattacks becoming an increasingly real issue, it’s critical for manufacturers to look for ways to improve all levels of security within the business. Now more than ever, manufacturers need to apply ICS and SCADA to protect systems against intentional or accidental security threats coming from inside or outside the organization.

To create a more secure environment, it’s suggested that manufacturers assess their current OT and IT processes and determine where upgrades need to be made. This will likely include adding layers of additional security throughout the organization. Ongoing and frequent assessments will help determine if a company can evolve and survive the newest hacking targets.

Secure Steps to Consider

Use intrusion detection and a firewall help protect the perimeter from an outside attack.

Secure communications through a virtual private network (VPN) and/or use Secure Sockets Layer (SSL).

Increase security by installing antivirus and host-based intrusion detection software.

Control security by limiting access to network elements and applications.

Protect the physical surroundings using locks and alarm monitoring systems.

 

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Let’s All Come Together to Celebrate Manufacturing Day 2018

MFG Day

Those who work in manufacturing understand continuing education is critical to demonstrate the career opportunities available as traditional manufacturing processes merge with technology. Yet, misconceptions about working in the industry persist. To combat these false ideas, those in manufacturing are offering individuals outside of the industry a personal look at what manufacturing means today.

 

National Manufacturing Day

Although National Manufacturing Day officially falls on October 5th this year, those who make their living in manufacturing understand it to be something worth celebrating each day. The first Manufacturing Day was started as an opportunity to highlight the positive elements of the industry to others and to dispel misconceptions. In October of 2014, President Obama signed a proclamation making National Manufacturing Day an official day recognizing the benefits and achievements of the manufacturing industry.

Inside View

Because of annual Manufacturing Day events, students and job seekers in the United States, have an opportunity to see the inner workings of the industry through factory tours, hands-on demonstrations and career-exploration panels. These efforts offer the next generation of workers and students an introduction to the current manufacturing environment.

In fact, 64 percent of students surveyed after attending a 2016 Manufacturing Day event came away feeling motivated to consider a career in manufacturing. Deloitte’s survey results show a potential 171,000 new members could join the workforce because of improved perceptions regarding the modernization of the manufacturing industry. This is an important step in filling the estimated 3.5 million manufacturing jobs between now and 2025, according to Deloitte.

Manufacturing Day also unites manufacturers in the U.S. in efforts to improve the public image of manufacturing, mend the skills gap and boost ongoing prosperity for the industry at large. During the month of October, manufacturers come together to address the industry’s collective challenges and to define the framework for the manufacturing industry moving forward.

Looking Forward

Officially celebrated the first Friday in October, this year’s occasion falls on Oct. 5 with additional events occurring throughout the month. During this time, manufacturers across the nation will showcase new industry technologies as they open the doors for factory tours, welcoming those outside of the industry to view manufacturing first-hand. To date, there are 387 Manufacturing Day events scheduled in the U.S. with 43 public and invitation-only events planned in Ohio.

Growth of the annual celebration is the result of ongoing efforts from the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), the Manufacturing Institute (MI) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology’s (NIST) Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP). NAM produces the annual event with support from the MI and MEP.

This article is brought to you by The Cleveland Deburring Machine Company. CDMC can provide a deburring solution for gears, sprockets, aerospace and defense, automotive deburring, power transmission, powdered metals, fluid power and custom deburring applications. Our no-charge application evaluation includes a detailed report and process description in as little as 3 to 5 business days. Contact CDMC today and speak with one of our experts!

 

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Robots + Humans Collaborating on The Manufacturing Floor = “Cobots”

fanuc robot manufacturing

 

 

 

 

 

Throughout the manufacturing industry, the density of robots continues to rise around the world. Such technological applications help free up time for tasks requiring creativity and thought. According to the International Federation of Robotics, there is an average of 74 robot units per 10,000 employees. This includes the high end of 99 units in Europe, 84 in the Americas and 63 in Asia.

Countries by Level of Automation

Republic of Korea

Singapore

Germany

Japan

Sweden

Denmark

United States

Italy

Belgium

Taiwan

Robot Density

Since 2016, robot density continues to grow, as represented by the United States’ No. 7 rank in the countries of automation list above. Robots have been part of ongoing efforts to strengthen the American market and keep manufacturing at home. The automotive industry leads the way in the use of robots and it’s anticipated that between 2017 and 2020 the use of robots will rise 15 percent each year on average, according to a report from the International Federation of Robotics.

Manufacturing Collaboration

Despite some fears of robots replacing jobs, robots are now a common scene in many factories as robots and humans learn to co-exist. One of the ways this is happening is through Robotic Process Automation or RPA. With technological similarities to graphical user interface testing tools, RPA tools can automate interactions with the graphical user interface. RPA can also mimic the task-based processes, speeding up repetitive tasks and freeing up humans for interaction and the application of intelligence, judgement and reasoning. With the potential to fully automate routine tasks, RPA can reduce the total cost of end-to-end transactional processes by 50 percent to 75 percent, according to an RPA release from The Hackett Group, a global strategy, operations and business application consulting firm.

Collaborations on the manufacturing floor also include self-navigating Autonomous Indoor Vehicles, which shift goods between workstations without the need for magnets or beacons. This joint work between human and robot was coined “cobot” by professors from Northwestern University and is being tested at Cornell Dubilier, a power manufacturer who is using robots to speed up the inspection of capacitor installations, doubling the speed of its labeling process.

Growing Demand in RPA

The behind-the-scenes aspect of RPA translates into a variety of applications from supply chains, interactions between IT systems and repetitive business office tasks. Adoption will necessitate an increasing level of comfort for manufacturers concerning robotics and artificial intelligence’s. It remains to be seen how quickly companies will embrace these technologies, but such adoption has the potential to revolutionize the industry and the work of those employed within it.

This article is brought to you by The Cleveland Deburring Machine Company. CDMC can provide a deburring solution for gears, sprockets, aerospace and defense, automotive deburring, power transmission, powdered metals, fluid power and custom deburring applications. Our no-charge application evaluation includes a detailed report and process description in as little as 3 to 5 business days. Contact CDMC today and speak with one of our experts!

 

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